Philosophy University Seminars

Philosophy university seminars are discussion-based introductions to philosophy. All seminars are taught by a regular faculty member, and none have more than 19 students. Some focus on particular philosophical questions or topics, while others range more widely.

Spring 2023 Courses

 


Philosophy University Seminar
13185 02 (23642)
Seachris
9:30-10:45 TR
First Year Students Only

What is real? What can you know? How can you be a better thinker? How should you respond when people disagree with you about important issues? Can faith be reasonable? Why is there so much suffering in the world? How should you live? You did not choose to exist, but here you are. In virtue of being here, and in virtue of being a human being, questions like these partly define and depict the condition—the human condition—in which we find ourselves. Philosophy was and continues to be a discipline that systematically attempts to frame and answer such questions with intellectual rigor—questions that we all ask at one time or another in one form or another.This course offers a targeted glimpse into key problems and questions in philosophy, with central aspects of the human condition serving as our guide. Course readings will include a mix of historic and contemporary philosophical sources, as well as publicly-engaged pieces aimed at connecting perennial philosophical questions to twenty-first century life.Most classes will consist of a combination of lecture, discussion, and group activities.

 


Philosophy University Seminar
13185 03 (21196)
Seachris
11:00-12:15 TR
First Year Students Only

What is real? What can you know? How can you be a better thinker? How should you respond when people disagree with you about important issues? Can faith be reasonable? Why is there so much suffering in the world? How should you live? You did not choose to exist, but here you are. In virtue of being here, and in virtue of being a human being, questions like these partly define and depict the condition—the human condition—in which we find ourselves. Philosophy was and continues to be a discipline that systematically attempts to frame and answer such questions with intellectual rigor—questions that we all ask at one time or another in one form or another.This course offers a targeted glimpse into key problems and questions in philosophy, with central aspects of the human condition serving as our guide. Course readings will include a mix of historic and contemporary philosophical sources, as well as publicly-engaged pieces aimed at connecting perennial philosophical questions to twenty-first century life.Most classes will consist of a combination of lecture, discussion, and group activities.


Philosophy University Seminar
13185 04 (21198)
Jech
12:30-1:45 TR
First Year Students Only
A general introduction to philosophy, taught in a seminar format, with emphasis on perennial problems such as the existence of God, human freedom, and moral obligation. The course is also intended to sharpen the student's skills of critical thinking.

 


Philosophy University Seminar: An Introduction to Philosophy
13185 05 (27646)
Jech
2:00-3:15 TR
First Year Students Only

 

A general introduction to philosophy, taught in a seminar format, with emphasis on perennial problems such as the existence of God, human freedom, and moral obligation. The course is also intended to sharpen the student's skills of critical thinking.


Philosophy University Seminar: An Introduction to Philosophy
13185 06 (25723)
D. Cory
9:30-10:45 TR
First Year Students Only

A general introduction to philosophy, taught in a seminar format, with emphasis on perennial problems such as the existence of God, human freedom, and moral obligation. The course is also intended to sharpen the student's skills of critical thinking.


Philosophy University Seminar: An Introduction to Philosophy
13185 07 (30984)
D. Cory
11:00-12:15 TR
First Year Students Only

A general introduction to philosophy, taught in a seminar format, with emphasis on perennial problems such as the existence of God, human freedom, and moral obligation. The course is also intended to sharpen the student's skills of critical thinking.


Honors Philosophy Seminar
13195 01 (30985)
Cross
11:00-12:15  TR

First Year Students Only

This course will look at central questions in philosophy, using both classical and contemporary sources. It will cover questions about what it is to know something, and what it is to have a rational belief; ethical problems about how we should behave, and whether morality might be objective; and questions about personal identity and what it is that exists.


Honors Philosophy Seminar
13195 02 (30986)
Roeber
12:30-1:45 TR

First Year Students Only

This course will explore the nature and relevance of philosophy, as well as major themes in Western philosophy, including the existence of God and the origins of the universe, knowledge of the external world, the mind-body problem, personal identity, free will, and morality. It also aims to teach how to think, read, and write critically about philosophical issues.


 


 


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