Introduction to Philosophy: The Big Questions

Spring 2019 Courses

Introduction to Philosophy
10101 01 (26393)
Rodriguez
8:20-9:10 MWF
First Year Students Only

This class will provide an overview of issues that are both important problems of philosophy and issues relevant to the lives of each of us: the existence of God and the problem of evil, the nature of human beings (whether we are more than just bodies, and whether we are free), and what moral standards we should follow (if any).  We will also deal with the particular moral issue of war and peace, examining in some detail the positions of pacifism and just war theory.

 

The goal is for students (a) to become familiar with the issues involved for each topic and with responses that have been posed to these questions (to this end students will be required to read pieces both classical and modern), and (b) to develop the abilities to analyze the alternatives and to adopt more well-thought-out positions of their own (to this end students will be required to participate in class discussions and regularly write papers responding to readings).  Class requirements include participation, three papers, and two exams.


Introduction to Philosophy
10101 02 (10352)

Rodriguez
9:25-10:15 MWF
First Year Students Only

This class will provide an overview of issues that are both important problems of philosophy and issues relevant to the lives of each of us: the existence of God and the problem of evil, the nature of human beings (whether we are more than just bodies, and whether we are free), and what moral standards we should follow (if any).  We will also deal with the particular moral issue of war and peace, examining in some detail the positions of pacifism and just war theory.

 

The goal is for students (a) to become familiar with the issues involved for each topic and with responses that have been posed to these questions (to this end students will be required to read pieces both classical and modern), and (b) to develop the abilities to analyze the alternatives and to adopt more well-thought-out positions of their own (to this end students will be required to participate in class discussions and regularly write papers responding to readings).  Class requirements include participation, three papers, and two exams.


Introduction to Philosophy
20101 01 (26353)
Hagaman
11:00-12:15 TR

This course explores a number of major themes in the Western philosophical tradition.  We will discuss the existence of abstract objects such as numbers, skepticism and the extent of human knowledge, freedom of the will and determinism, the rationality of religious belief and the existence of God, the nature of persons, and finally, the demands of morality.  The goals of the course will be to familiarize ourselves with some arguments for and against various positions one can take on these issues as well as to develop the ability to think and write clearly, critically, carefully, concisely and precisely about them.


Introduction to Philosophy
20101 02 (24023)
Snapper
9:30-10:45 MW

This course introduces students to some philosophical questions and helps them become more skilled at formulating and understanding arguments. Each class will be a mixture of lecture and discussion. We will discuss arguments, morality, God, religion and science, race, climate change, abortion, personhood, knowledge, and freedom.


Introduction to Philosophy
20101 03 (26354)
Snapper
11:00-12:15 MW

This course introduces students to some philosophical questions and helps them become more skilled at formulating and understanding arguments. Each class will be a mixture of lecture and discussion. We will discuss arguments, morality, God, religion and science, race, climate change, abortion, personhood, knowledge, and freedom.


Introduction to Philosophy
20101 04 (30864)
Schmitt
12:30-1:45 TR

Philosophy engages a capacity we all have to wonder—about ourselves, the world, and our place in the world. This course enables you to systematically examine these topics, reflecting on your own views as well as the relationships between your views and alternative views espoused by great thinkers throughout history. We explore questions falling under five main headings:

(1) Epistemology: What is knowledge? What justifies us in believing what we do?
(2) Metaphysics: What are we like as human beings? Are we free? Are we morally responsible? Are we primarily thinkers or doers?
(3) Philosophy of Religion: Does God exist? If God exists, why is there evil in the world? Should we practice a religion?
(4) Ethics: How should we live? Are there objective moral truths? What does morality require?
(5) Existentialism: Is death bad? What makes our lives meaningful?


Introduction to Philosophy
20101 05 (30865)
Schmitt
2:00-3:15 TR

Philosophy engages a capacity we all have to wonder—about ourselves, the world, and our place in the world. This course enables you to systematically examine these topics, reflecting on your own views as well as the relationships between your views and alternative views espoused by great thinkers throughout history. We explore questions falling under five main headings:

(1) Epistemology: What is knowledge? What justifies us in believing what we do?
(2) Metaphysics: What are we like as human beings? Are we free? Are we morally responsible? Are we primarily thinkers or doers?
(3) Philosophy of Religion: Does God exist? If God exists, why is there evil in the world? Should we practice a religion?
(4) Ethics: How should we live? Are there objective moral truths? What does morality require?
(5) Existentialism: Is death bad? What makes our lives meaningful?


Introduction to Philosophy
20101 06 (30866)
Snapper
2:00-3:15 MW

This course introduces students to some philosophical questions and helps them become more skilled at formulating and understanding arguments. Each class will be a mixture of lecture and discussion. We will discuss arguments, morality, God, religion and science, race, climate change, abortion, personhood, knowledge, and freedom.