Introduction to Philosophy: The Big Questions

Fall 2022 Courses

 


Introduction to Philosophy
10100 (19971)
Cross
9:30-10:20 TR
First Year Students Only
A Discussion Section is Required.  PHIL 12100

The course deals with some of the central issues of modern philosophy - what exists, the nature of good and evil, what it is to act well, what we can know, and what it is to have a reasonable belief. The course is structured thematically, though attention is given too to some of the key texts from the history of philosophy and the Catholic tradition.


Introduction to Philosophy
10101 01 (21351)
Zhao
9:30-10:45 TR
First Year Students Only

This course will be an introduction to some of the biggest, and most interesting, questions of philosophy: What is the self? What is time? Do we have free will? Can we even know that the world exists? How should I live my life? While this course won’t answer these questions definitively, it will give you some of the skills to think about them clearly and deeply.


Introduction to Philosophy
20101 01 (14543)
Bischof
2:00-3:15 TR
Must be a Sophomore, Junior, or Senior

This course continues the deep sense of wonder you had while roasting marshmallows over the campfire: ‘what can I know?’, ‘what ought I do?’, what can I hope?’. Your answers to these questions will shape the leading question of the course: ‘what is the human being?’. Many philosophers and some literary writers will guide you in your exploration of these questions. These include Aristotle, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Thomas Aquinas, as well as Shakespeare and Dostoevsky. At the end of the course, you will have a better understanding of the human condition. Along the way, you will be trained in the liberal arts of language – grammar, logic, and rhetoric – so that you can effectively engage with arguments in both writing and speaking. 


Introduction to Philosophy
20101 02 (10961)
Bischof
3:30-4:45 TR
Must be a Sophomore, Junior, or Senior

This course continues the deep sense of wonder you had while roasting marshmallows over the campfire: ‘what can I know?’, ‘what ought I do?’, what can I hope?’. Your answers to these questions will shape the leading question of the course: ‘what is the human being?’. Many philosophers and some literary writers will guide you in your exploration of these questions. These include Aristotle, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Thomas Aquinas, as well as Shakespeare and Dostoevsky. At the end of the course, you will have a better understanding of the human condition. Along the way, you will be trained in the liberal arts of language – grammar, logic, and rhetoric – so that you can effectively engage with arguments in both writing and speaking. 


Introduction to Philosophy
20101 03 (14150)
Comstock
11:00-12:15 TR
Must be a Sophomore, Junior, or Senior


Introduction to Philosophy
20101 04 (21618)
Comstock
2:00-3:15 TR
Must be a Sophomore, Junior, or Senior


Introduction to Philosophy
20101 05 (21890)
Scott
2:00-3:15 TR
Must be a Sophomore, Junior, or Senior


Introduction to Philosophy
20101 06 (21891)
Scott
3:30-4:45 TR
Must be a Sophomore, Junior, or Senior