Joseph Karbowski

Joseph Karbowski

Title

Assistant Professor of Philosophy

Contact Information

Mailing Address:
Department of Philosophy
University of Notre Dame
100 Malloy Hall
Notre Dame, IN 46556

Phone: (574) 631-1096 
Email: joseph.karbowski.1@nd.edu

Office: 206 Malloy
Office Hours: M 10:15-12:15

Education

Ph.D., UC Berkeley 

Areas of Interest

Ancient philosophy (especially Aristotle), metaphysics, ethics 

Profile

My main area of research is Ancient Greek Philosophy, especially Aristotle’s philosophy of science, ethics/politics, epistemology, and natural philosophy (including his biology). I have a special interest in Aristotle’s views about proper procedure or methodology in science and philosophy. Recently, I have been exploring these methodological questions with particular reference to ethics. I believe that ethics is far more scientific (in the Aristotelian sense) in its methodology and cognitive ambitions for Aristotle than scholars tend to think. I initially developed (and of course elaborated upon) this view in my dissertation, but it was narrowly focused upon a particular line of inquiry in the Nicomachean Ethics, viz. the inquiry into eudaimonia. I have since been exploring the merits of extending this scientific reading to the Politics, and, currently, the Eudemian Ethics. I have a related interest in Aristotle’s conception of dialectical reasoning in the Topics and the nature of the claims—reputable beliefs or endoxa—upon which it is based. A second major research focus concerns the conception of human nature in the ethico-political works and in particular the place and status of natural slaves and women in that conception. This second topic is a nice window into Aristotle's conception of the relation between the rational and political facets of human nature. I also have side interests in Metaphysics and Moral Philosophy.

Selected Publications

  • 'Justification "by Argument" in Aristotle's Natural Science', forthcoming Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 51
  • "Phainomena as Witnesses and Examples: The Methodology of Eudemian Ethics 1.6", forthcoming in Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 49 (2015): 193-225.
  • “Deliberating without Authority: Fortenbaugh on the Psychology of Women in Aristotle’s Politics”, forthcoming in Philosophy News.
  • “Aristotle on the Outline Status of Ethical First Principles”, forthcoming in Antike Naturwissenschaft und ihre Rezeption.
  • “Aristotle on the Rational Abilities of Women”, forthcoming at Apeiron
  • “Empirical Eulogos Argumentation in Aristotle’s Generation of Animals III.10”, British Journal for the     History of Philosophy  22, 1 (2014): 25-38. 
  • “Slaves, Women, and Aristotle’s Natural Teleology”, Ancient Philosophy 32, 2 (2012): 323-50.
  • “Aristotle’s Scientific Inquiry into Natural Slavery”, Journal of the History of Philosophy 51, 3 (2013): 331- 53.
  • “Endoxa, Facts, and the Starting Points of the NE”, forthcoming in Bridging the Gap Between Aristotle’s Science and Ethics, edited by Karen Nielsen and Devin Henry, Cambridge University Press. 
  • “Complexity and Progression in Aristotle’s Treatment of Endoxa in the Topics”, forthcoming in Ancient Philosophy.

Website: http://karbo318.wixsite.com/philo