Spring 2013

Spring 2013 Course Descriptions

Introduction to Philosophy 
10100 01 (22372) 

Sullivan
2:00-2:50 TR (F) 
First Year Students Only 
co-requirement 12100

In this lecture-based course, you will learn about some key debates in the history of philosophy. Questions we'll consider include:

(1) Epistemology: What is knowledge?  What kinds of truths can we be certain of?

(2) Philosophy of Religion: Does a god exist?  If the God of Judaism, Christianity, or Islam exists, then how do we explain the seemingly gratuitous evils that occur every day?  Are particular religious or philosophical beliefs rationally justifiable? 

(3) Metaphysics: What is it to be a person?  Are human agents free? If so, what is it precisely to have free will?  Is the future fixed or open? What kinds of changes can a person survive?

(4) Ethics: Should we always act to promote the greatest good for the greatest number?   Are there objective moral truths?  How can we determine if a moral theory is true?

We'll look at historical and contemporary arguments purporting to answer these questions.  And you will learn how to use the tools of informal logic to evaluate these arguments and construct arguments of your own. More information can be found at the course website: https://sites.google.com/site/sullivanmeghan/introduction-to-philosophy-10100

Introduction to Philosophy 
10101 01 (21415) 

Leach-Krouse
8:30-9:20 MWF 
First Year Students Only

This one semester course is an introduction to the methods, the vocabulary, and a small fragment of the subject matter of Philosophy. We will ask difficult questions like:

• Is there a God? 
• Are we free? 
• How should we reason? How should we come to believe things? 
• What kind of life is moral? 
• What kind of life is good?

and familiarize ourselves with some of the approaches that philosophers of different historical periods have taken to justifying their answers to such questions. By the end of the semester, you should expect (1) to know more about what a few philosophers have said about these weighty matters, (2) to better appreciate the challenges these questions present to all of us, and (3) to have acquired a few versatile tools for thinking clearly about such questions (and, incidentally, for thinking clearly about everything else as well)."

Introduction to Philosophy 
10101 02 (21853) 

Leach-Krouse
9:35-10:25 MWF
First Year Students Only

This one semester course is an introduction to the methods, the vocabulary, and a small fragment of the subject matter of Philosophy. We will ask difficult questions like:

• Is there a God? 
• Are we free? 
• How should we reason? How should we come to believe things? 
• What kind of life is moral? 
• What kind of life is good?

and familiarize ourselves with some of the approaches that philosophers of different historical periods have taken to justifying their answers to such questions. By the end of the semester, you should expect (1) to know more about what a few philosophers have said about these weighty matters, (2) to better appreciate the challenges these questions present to all of us, and (3) to have acquired a few versatile tools for thinking clearly about such questions (and, incidentally, for thinking clearly about everything else as well)."

Introduction to Philosophy 
10101 03 (20446) 

Gustin
11:45-12:35  MWF 
First Year Students Only

Philosophy is the one of the oldest and most important intellectual traditions in the humanities. Philosophy is primarily concerned with the art of critical thinking. Critical thinking is an incredibly useful skill no matter what profession you go into. The ability to assess arguments and question assumptions is an essential skill that everyone should have. Philosophy uses critical thinking to tackle questions like: Why be moral? What can I know? Am I free? Does God exist? What is a just society? What is the meaning of life? As you can see, philosophers have asked some pretty big questions. In this class we will try to tackle some of these big questions ourselves while looking at some very important historical answers that have been given to these questions.

Introduction to Philosophy 
10101 04 (20395)
 
Gustin
12:50-1:40 MWF 
First Year Students Only

Philosophy is the one of the oldest and most important intellectual traditions in the humanities. Philosophy is primarily concerned with the art of critical thinking. Critical thinking is an incredibly useful skill no matter what profession you go into. The ability to assess arguments and question assumptions is an essential skill that everyone should have. Philosophy uses critical thinking to tackle questions like: Why be moral? What can I know? Am I free? Does God exist? What is a just society? What is the meaning of life? As you can see, philosophers have asked some pretty big questions. In this class we will try to tackle some of these big questions ourselves while looking at some very important historical answers that have been given to these questions.

Introduction to Philosophy 
10101 05 (21104) 

Strimple
9:30-10:45 TR
First Year Students Only

It is difficult to pin down a specific subject matter for philosophy. This is largely because philosophy has something to say about nearly everything. So rather than setting ourselves the impossible task of discussing nearly everything this semester, we will look at several topics that have exercised philosophers throughout history, for example, the existence of God, free will, personal identity, the nature of knowledge, the nature of morality. The course is designed to introduce you to some of philosophy's greatest historical figures and some prominent contemporary philosophers by looking in detail at the methodology that is arguably common to all philosophy: more or less rigorous argumentation. To this end, our day-to-day focus will be on reconstructing the arguments that we will encounter in the readings.

Introduction to Philosophy 
10101 06 (21524) 

Strimple
11:00-12:15 TR 
First Year Students Only

It is difficult to pin down a specific subject matter for philosophy. This is largely because philosophy has something to say about nearly everything. So rather than setting ourselves the impossible task of discussing nearly everything this semester, we will look at several topics that have exercised philosophers throughout history, for example, the existence of God, free will, personal identity, the nature of knowledge, the nature of morality. The course is designed to introduce you to some of philosophy's greatest historical figures and some prominent contemporary philosophers by looking in detail at the methodology that is arguably common to all philosophy: more or less rigorous argumentation. To this end, our day-to-day focus will be on reconstructing the arguments that we will encounter in the readings.

Introduction to Philosophy 
10101 07 (20199) 

Peterson
11:00-12:15 TR 
First Year Students Only

This course aims to introduce students to some of the central questions which have provoked the wonder and curiosity of philosophers since ancient times, to the methods which they have employed to pursue answers to these questions, and to the ways of understanding human nature, the ethical life, the human relationship to God, and human happiness to which their quests for answers have led them.  As we study the views of various figures throughout the history of philosophy, our focus will be on the following topics:

1) Human Nature:  What are human beings?  Are they merely souls?  Are they merely bodies?  Are they a combination of soul and body?  To shed light on the merits or demerits of each of these views, we will explore and assess how each view can account for human persistence through time.

2) The Ethical Life:  Is there an objective answer to the question of whether a given act is morally right or morally wrong?  If so, what determines the rightness or wrongness of that act?  God?  A categorical moral law?  The consequences of the act?  Its relation to human happiness?  What philosophical dilemmas face us in practical situations as we make judgments about moral responsibility and about which acts are morally right?

3) God and Humanity: If God exists, how can humans come to knowledge of God?  Can we give arguments for the existence of God based on the idea of God, or based on the nature of the world we experience? How can we think critically about reconciling the existence of God with the presence of evil in the world?  How can we coherently conceptualize the relationship between, on the one hand, God’s providential knowledge of and guidance of the world, and on the other hand, human freedom?

4) Human Happiness:  What is involved in human happiness, and how can human beings achieve it? In pursuing these questions, we will read works by ancient, medieval, modern, and contemporary philosophers.  The course has two interrelated aims: 1) to come to an understanding of and to be able to critically evaluate different ways of answering these questions, which will require 2) developing our skills in reasoning and argumentation as we discern fallacies in various arguments, assess their strengths and weaknesses, and attempt to formulate good arguments ourselves.

Introduction to Philosophy 
10101 08 (21271) 

Peterson
12:30-1:45 TR 
First Year Students Only

This course aims to introduce students to some of the central questions which have provoked the wonder and curiosity of philosophers since ancient times, to the methods which they have employed to pursue answers to these questions, and to the ways of understanding human nature, the ethical life, the human relationship to God, and human happiness to which their quests for answers have led them.  As we study the views of various figures throughout the history of philosophy, our focus will be on the following topics:

1) Human Nature:  What are human beings?  Are they merely souls?  Are they merely bodies?  Are they a combination of soul and body?  To shed light on the merits or demerits of each of these views, we will explore and assess how each view can account for human persistence through time.

2) The Ethical Life:  Is there an objective answer to the question of whether a given act is morally right or morally wrong?  If so, what determines the rightness or wrongness of that act?  God?  A categorical moral law?  The consequences of the act?  Its relation to human happiness?  What philosophical dilemmas face us in practical situations as we make judgments about moral responsibility and about which acts are morally right?

3) God and Humanity: If God exists, how can humans come to knowledge of God?  Can we give arguments for the existence of God based on the idea of God, or based on the nature of the world we experience? How can we think critically about reconciling the existence of God with the presence of evil in the world?  How can we coherently conceptualize the relationship between, on the one hand, God’s providential knowledge of and guidance of the world, and on the other hand, human freedom?

4) Human Happiness:  What is involved in human happiness, and how can human beings achieve it? In pursuing these questions, we will read works by ancient, medieval, modern, and contemporary philosophers.  The course has two interrelated aims: 1) to come to an understanding of and to be able to critically evaluate different ways of answering these questions, which will require 2) developing our skills in reasoning and argumentation as we discern fallacies in various arguments, assess their strengths and weaknesses, and attempt to formulate good arguments ourselves.

Introduction to Philosophy 
10101 09 (23098) 

McCollum
12:30-1:45 TR 
First Year Students Only

This course is designed as an introduction to several of the central questions in the philosophical tradition.  Among the questions we will consider are ‘What can I know?’, ‘Does God exist?’, ‘Why should I be moral?’, ‘What is justice?’.  Readings will include both contemporary approaches to these questions as well as selections from Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hume, Kant, Nietzsche, and others.

Required Texts: Philosophy: The Quest for Truth, 8th Edition (Oxford, 2012).  Other texts will be made available.

Course Requirements: active participation, two short papers, one longer paper, two exams.

Introduction to Philosophy 
10101 10 (23746) 

McCollum
3:30-4:45 TR 
First Year Students Only

This course is designed as an introduction to several of the central questions in the philosophical tradition.  Among the questions we will consider are ‘What can I know?’, ‘Does God exist?’, ‘Why should I be moral?’, ‘What is justice?’.  Readings will include both contemporary approaches to these questions as well as selections from Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hume, Kant, Nietzsche, and others.

Required Texts: Philosophy: The Quest for Truth, 8th Edition (Oxford, 2012).  Other texts will be made available.

Course Requirements: active participation, two short papers, one longer paper, two exams.

Introduction to Philosophy 
10101 11 (24098) 

Rafalski
3:30-4:45 TR
First Year Students Only

This course will introduce students to philosophy and critical thinking. We will consider some of the most enduring philosophical questions, through both class discussion and careful reading of original texts. The topics covered will include:

- What can I know for certain?
- Do we have free will?
- What is a person?
- What are our responsibilities to others?
- What makes an action right or wrong?

The goals of this course are: (1) to learn to read philosophical texts critically, (2) to learn to write clearly and convincingly in response to these texts, (3) to understand some of the key problems with which philosophers are concerned, (4) to begin to develop one's own answers to important philosophical questions.

Introduction to Philosophy 
10101 12 (24099) 

Snapper
9:30-10:45 TR
First Year Students Only

This course introduces students to some philosophical questions and helps them become more skilled at formulating and understanding arguments. Each class will be a mixture of lecture and discussion. The questions we will address are ‘What makes an argument good?’, ‘Is morality objective?’, ‘Is religion compatible with science?’, ‘What is a person?’, ‘What is freedom?’, and ‘Do we know anything?’.

Introduction to Philosophy 
10101 13 (25613) 

Rafalski
5:00-6:15 TR
First Year Students Only

This course will introduce students to philosophy and critical thinking. We will consider some of the most enduring philosophical questions, through both class discussion and careful reading of original texts. The topics covered will include:

- What can I know for certain?
- Do we have free will?
- What is a person?
- What are our responsibilities to others?
- What makes an action right or wrong?

The goals of this course are: (1) to learn to read philosophical texts critically, (2) to learn to write clearly and convincingly in response to these texts, (3) to understand some of the key problems with which philosophers are concerned, (4) to begin to develop one's own answers to important philosophical questions.

Introduction to Philosophy 
10101 14 (28742)
 
Rettler
5:00-6:15 TR
First Year Students Only

Philosophy is distinguished both by its subject matter and by the method with which it investigates its subject matter. Among its subject matter are those most basic and most important questions we can ask: Is there a God? What do we know? What is there? What are we? Are we free? How should we live? Its method is logically valid arguments proceeding from things we already believe. In this class we will aim to answer the above questions by proceeding from things we believe via truth-preserving inferences, and we'll defend our premises. Along the way we'll also look at how others have answered these questions.

Introduction to Philosophy 
10101 15 (TBA)
 
Immerman
1:55-2:45 MWF
First Year Students Only

This course will introduce students to some of the topics that philosophers discuss and to the ways they go about discussing them. It will mostly consider contemporary texts, but draw on historical sources where relevant.

Some questions we will explore include: What do we mean when we make moral claims? Why be moral? Is eating meat morally acceptable? Do we have a duty to donate to charity? What are the main sources of our knowledge? Can skeptical arguments successfully show that we do not have any knowledge? What are the best arguments for and against the existence of God?

In the course of examining these topics, we will focus on developing various philosophical skills, including: reading a text to find the main arguments and conclusions and analyzing the strengths and weakness of arguments.

Philosophy University Seminar
13185 01 (21539)

Blanchette
9:30-10:45 TR 
First Year Students Only

This seminar is an introduction to several central issues in philosophy, using both historical and contemporary texts. Topics to be treated will include some subset of these: The nature of human knowledge, the existence of God and the rationality of faith, the nature of the human mind (and its relation to the brain), ethical theory.

Requirements include active seminar participation, a number of short and medium-length writing assignments, quizzes, and exams.

Philosophy University Seminar
13185 02 (21869)

Bays
11:00-12:15 TR 
First Year Students Only

There's an old tradition in Western philosophy which says that people can't *really* be moral (or happy or virtuous or excellent) unless they spend a lot of time thinking, both about morality itself and about certain more purely intellectual subjects (for instance, mathematics and philosophy). The majority of this course will examine some classical---i.e., Greek---developments of this idea. At the end, we'll examine some more-modern responses to it.

Philosophy University Seminar
13185 03 (22001)

Holloway
12:30-1:45 TR 
First Year Students Only

This course is a problems oriented introduction to philosophy.   This semester we will be considering three philosophical problems:  The Foundations of Morality; Freedom and Determinism; and The Existence of God.  One goal of the course is for you to gain anunderstanding of what philosophy is by seeing how philosophers go about formulating and answering a philosophical question.  Another goal of the course is for you to be able to read, on your own, a philosophical piece of writing and be able to (1) identify the philosophical question the author is trying to answer, and what the author’s answer is;  (2) identify what the authors arguments are for the answer he/she gives to the philosophical question;  (3) assess how good the authors arguments are; and (4) state and argue for your own answer to a philosophical question. 

Philosophy University Seminar
13185 04 (22002)

DePaul
12:30-1:45 TR 
First Year Students Only

Two things follow from the fact that this is a University Seminar: (1) Classes will have a discussion rather than a lecture format. (2) The course will be writing intensive, with students required to write and rewrite three short papers (5-7 pages).

As an introduction to philosophy, we will use contemporary and historical texts to examine a number of questions that have vexed philosophers from ancient times to the present:

Does God exist?
Why does God allow evil?
Can we know about the world external to our own thoughts and sensations, and if we can, how?
What if anything unifies our selves through time?
Are there any objective moral truths or are all moral claims relative?
What determines whether an action is right or wrong? Is it the consequences of the action, the intentions of the actor, or something else?
What is the good life for a human being?

Philosophy University Seminar
13185 05 (22003)

Watson
3:30-4:45 TR 
First Year Students Only

An examination of fundamental questions about the nature of human existence, based on a critical examination of works in the existentialist tradition.

Philosophy University Seminar
13185 06 (22004)

Stubenberg
5:00-6:15 TR 
First Year Students Only

 

This is an introduction to philosophy. We will start by reading a contemporary philosopher's set of meditations about knowledge and the self (much in the style of Descartes famous Meditations on First Philosophy, but with very different conclusions). Then we move on to one of the most famous anti-materialist texts in all of philosophy: Bishop Berkeley's Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous. He argues that only minds and their ideas exist. The next section of the course is devoted to the philosophy of mind. Berkeley argued that the brain is nothing but an idea in the mind. Alva Noe holds that brain is a material object, just like all the objects that exist. Nevertheless it would be a serious mistake to think that our consciousness is located in our brains. The last part of the course will address the question of how we should live--perhaps the most important question of ethics.

Requirements:
5 short papers (1500 words each)
Attendance and participation in classroom discussion.

Books:
Stephen Hetherington: Self-Knowledge: Beginning Philosophy Right Here and Now.
George Berkeley: Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous.
Alva Noë: Out of Our Heads: Why You Are Not Your Brain and Other Lessons from the Biology of Consciousness.
Harry Frankfurt: The Reasons of Love

Philosophy University Seminar
13185 07 (22005)
Stubenberg
3:30-4:45 TR 
First Year Students Only

This is an introduction to philosophy. We will start by reading a contemporary philosopher's set of meditations about knowledge and the self (much in the style of Descartes famous Meditations on First Philosophy, but with very different conclusions). Then we move on to one of the most famous anti-materialist texts in all of philosophy: Bishop Berkeley's Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous. He argues that only minds and their ideas exist. The next section of the course is devoted to the philosophy of mind. Berkeley argued that the brain is nothing but an idea in the mind. Alva Noe holds that brain is a material object, just like all the objects that exist. Nevertheless it would be a serious mistake to think that our consciousness is located in our brains. The last part of the course will address the question of how we should live--perhaps the most important question of ethics.

Requirements:
5 short papers (1500 words each)
Attendance and participation in classroom discussion.

Books:
Stephen Hetherington: Self-Knowledge: Beginning Philosophy Right Here and Now.
George Berkeley: Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous.
Alva Noë: Out of Our Heads: Why You Are Not Your Brain and Other Lessons from the Biology of Consciousness.
Harry Frankfurt: The Reasons of Love

Introduction to Philosophy 
20101 01 (20444)

Fisher
9:30-10:45 TR

As the name of the course suggests, the aim of this course is to introduce students to philosophy. Since the beginning of philosophy in ancient Greece, however, philosophers have disagreed about what exactly philosophy is (Is it a way of life? Or is it the study of a certain subject matter?) and, accordingly, about what the value or purpose of philosophy is (Is philosophy valuable because the philosophical life is the best kind of life? Or is philosophy useful because it establishes the foundations of science?).

In this course we will examine various answers that have been given to these questions by looking at the greatest philosophers “in action” – that is, by reading some of their most important, influential, and greatest philosophical works. In the course of our examination of various philosophers, we will examine, among other things:

 -The relationship between philosophy and science
 -What knowledge is and how we come to have it
 -What we ought to do and why we ought to do it
-What the good life is and what the relationship between it and philosophy is
 -Arguments for the existence of God
 -The relationship between faith and reason

By the end of this course, you should have a very general understanding of the history of philosophy and a general understanding of some of the most influential and interesting ways of conceiving of, and doing, philosophy.

Introduction to Philosophy 
20101 02 (20001)

Fisher
12:30-1:45 TR

As the name of the course suggests, the aim of this course is to introduce students to philosophy. Since the beginning of philosophy in ancient Greece, however, philosophers have disagreed about what exactly philosophy is (Is it a way of life? Or is it the study of a certain subject matter?) and, accordingly, about what the value or purpose of philosophy is (Is philosophy valuable because the philosophical life is the best kind of life? Or is philosophy useful because it establishes the foundations of science?). 

In this course we will examine various answers that have been given to these questions by looking at the greatest philosophers “in action” – that is, by reading some of their most important, influential, and greatest philosophical works. In the course of our examination of various philosophers, we will examine, among other things:

-The relationship between philosophy and science 
-What knowledge is and how we come to have it
-What we ought to do and why we ought to do it
 -What the good life is and what the relationship between it and   philosophy is
-Arguments for the existence of God
-The relationship between faith and reason

By the end of this course, you should have a very general understanding of the history of philosophy and a general understanding of some of the most influential and interesting ways of conceiving of, and doing, philosophy.

Introduction to Philosophy 
20101 03 (21149)

Hagaman
3:30-4:45 TR

This course explores a number of major themes in the Western philosophical tradition.  We will discuss the existence of abstract objects such as numbers, skepticism and the extent of human knowledge, freedom of the will and determinism, the rationality of religious belief and the existence of God, the nature of persons, and finally, the demands of morality.  The goals of the course will be to familiarize ourselves with some arguments for and against various positions one can take on these issues as well as to develop the ability to think and write clearly, critically, carefully, concisely and precisely about them.

Introduction to Philosophy 
20101 04 (20854)

Hagaman
5:00-6:15 TR

This course explores a number of major themes in the Western philosophical tradition.  We will discuss the existence of abstract objects such as numbers, skepticism and the extent of human knowledge, freedom of the will and determinism, the rationality of religious belief and the existence of God, the nature of persons, and finally, the demands of morality.  The goals of the course will be to familiarize ourselves with some arguments for and against various positions one can take on these issues as well as to develop the ability to think and write clearly, critically, carefully, concisely and precisely about them.

Introduction to Philosophy 
20101 05 (26203
)
Boyce
11:45-12:35 MWF

Philosophers seek to raise and answer important questions about ourselves and the nature of reality and to do so with clarity and intellectual rigor. What follows is a (very small) sample of questions that philosophers often address: Does God exist? What is the nature of human beings? What do we know and how do we know it? Can we survive death? Do we have free will? What is the nature of right and wrong? What is the nature of time? In this course, we will explore the ways in which philosophers have attempted to answer these questions (as well as others).

Introduction to Philosophy 
20101 06 (28743)

Boyce
12:50-1:40 TR

Philosophers seek to raise and answer important questions about ourselves and the nature of reality and to do so with clarity and intellectual rigor. What follows is a (very small) sample of questions that philosophers often address: Does God exist? What is the nature of human beings? What do we know and how do we know it? Can we survive death? Do we have free will? What is the nature of right and wrong? What is the nature of time? In this course, we will explore the ways in which philosophers have attempted to answer these questions (as well as others).

Philosophy of Human Nature
20201 01 (26205)

Reimers
8:30-9:20 MWF

When we speak about "human nature" we refer not only to our ontological constitution, but also to how we behave, what we most want, and what we love and hate. In this course we will examine our human nature in relation to knowledge, love, and our orientation to transcendent goods. In short, by examining human nature we also explore the meaning of human life.

Texts will be drawn from the Vatican Council's Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes, Plato's Republic, Thomas Aquinas's Treatise on Happiness, John Stuart Mill’s Utilitarianism¸ and Karol Wojtyla's Love and Responsibility.

Course requirements: six quizzes, one term paper, and a final exam.

Philosophy of Human Nature 
20201 02 (26204)

Reimers
9:35-10:25 MWF

When we speak about "human nature" we refer not only to our ontological constitution, but also to how we behave, what we most want, and what we love and hate. In this course we will examine our human nature in relation to knowledge, love, and our orientation to transcendent goods. In short, by examining human nature we also explore the meaning of human life.

Texts will be drawn from the Vatican Council's Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et SpesPlato's Republic, Thomas Aquinas's Treatise on Happiness, John Stuart Mill’s Utilitarianism¸ and Karol Wojtyla's Love and Responsibility.

Course requirements: six quizzes, one term paper, and a final exam.

Existentialist Themes
20202 01 (26206)

Rush
12:30-1:45 TR

This course will provide an introduction to existentialism by focusing on the writings of Dostoievski (Notes from the Underground), Soren Kierkegaard (Fear and Trembling/Sickness Unto Death), Friedrich Nietzsche (Birth of Tragedy, Genealogy of Morals, and Zarathustra), and Jean-Paul Sartre (Nausea, Existentialism and Human Emotions, and selections from Being and Nothingness). Topics covered will include: the nature of human freedom and creativity, the relation of religion and morality, the meaning of existence. Classes will focus on a close analysis of the text, with lectures to fill in the appropriate philosophical background.

Requirements: Two papers, a mid-term and a final examination.

Love & Friendship: An Intro
20222 01 (28745)

Delaney, Jr.
12:30-1:45

Love and friendship have been central topics in moral philosophy since the Ancient Greeks. In this course we will be examining these topics through literary and philosophical writings from Aristotle to Stendhal, as well as looking at some of the very best recent philosophical literature. Students will be expected to write a midterm paper, a final paper and sit a final exam. Attendance and robust discussion are expected.

Love & Friendship: An Intro
20222 02 (28744)

Delaney, Jr.
3:30-1:45 TR

Love and friendship have been central topics in moral philosophy since the Ancient Greeks. In this course we will be examining these topics through literary and philosophical writings from Aristotle to Stendhal, as well as looking at some of the very best recent philosophical literature. Students will be expected to write a midterm paper, a final paper and sit a final exam. Attendance and robust discussion are expected.

Ethics
20401 01 (21974)

Sterba
10:40-11:30 MWF
Cross List: HESB 30263 01

This course will begin by considering three challenges to a reason-based morality: 1) It’s all relative, 2) It’s better to be an egoist, 3) Morality is determined by religion not reason. Assuming we can overcome these challenges - if we can’t, we will stop the course right here - but if we can, we will then evaluate three traditional moral perspectives: 1) Kantian morality (It is all about doing your duty), 2) Utilitarian morality (It is all about maximizing utility), and 3) Aristotelian morality (It is all about being virtuous) to see if one of them is better than the others. That accomplished, we will then take up three challenges to a traditional conception of morality: 1) the Feminist challenge (Traditional morality is biased against women), 2) the Environmental challenge (Traditional morality is biased against nonhuman living beings), and 3) the Multicultural challenge (Traditional morality is biased against nonWestern cultures). Assuming we think some defensible form of morality survives these challenges (We will take a vote), we will then go on to apply that morality to the solution of a number of problems. You will select which ones from the following: the Distribution of Income and Wealth, Distant Peoples and Future Generations, Abortion and Euthanasia, Human Enhancement, Work and Family Responsibilities, Women’s and Men’s Roles, Affirmative Action, Pornography, Sexual Harassment, Gay and Lesbian Rights, Animal Liberation and Environmental Justice, Punishment and Responsibility, and War, Torture and Terrorism.

Texts:

Introducing Ethics (Pearson, 2012)
Morality in Practice 8th edition (Wadsworth/Cengage, 2011)

Requirements: Three papers 5-7 pages (1500-2100 words), e-mail comments on all readings, and participation in class discussions.

Ethics
20401 02 (22058)

Sterba
1:55-2:45 MWF
Cross List: HESB 30263 02

This course will begin by considering three challenges to a reason-based morality: 1) It’s all relative, 2) It’s better to be an egoist, 3) Morality is determined by religion not reason. Assuming we can overcome these challenges - if we can’t, we will stop the course right here - but if we can, we will then evaluate three traditional moral perspectives: 1) Kantian morality (It is all about doing your duty), 2) Utilitarian morality (It is all about maximizing utility), and 3) Aristotelian morality (It is all about being virtuous) to see if one of them is better than the others. That accomplished, we will then take up three challenges to a traditional conception of morality: 1) the Feminist challenge (Traditional morality is biased against women), 2) the Environmental challenge (Traditional morality is biased against nonhuman living beings), and 3) the Multicultural challenge (Traditional morality is biased against nonWestern cultures). Assuming we think some defensible form of morality survives these challenges (We will take a vote), we will then go on to apply that morality to the solution of a number of problems. You will select which ones from the following: the Distribution of Income and Wealth, Distant Peoples and Future Generations, Abortion and Euthanasia, Human Enhancement, Work and Family Responsibilities, Women’s and Men’s Roles, Affirmative Action, Pornography, Sexual Harassment, Gay and Lesbian Rights, Animal Liberation and Environmental Justice, Punishment and Responsibility, and War, Torture and Terrorism.

Texts:

Introducing Ethics (Pearson, 2012)
Morality in Practice 8th edition (Wadsworth/Cengage, 2011)

Requirements: Three papers 5-7 pages (1500-2100 words), e-mail comments on all readings, and participation in class discussions.

Ethics
20401 03 (23787)

Baldwin
5:00-6:15 TR

As humans, we have the capacity to reflect on what we are doing and why we are doing it. Reflection and reason brings to light considerations on the basis of which we may choose one course of action rather than another; it also enables us to ask whether or not we have good reasons to do what we do. One question that naturally comes to mind here is one of the most fundamental questions of moral philosophy: “How Should I Live?” This course focuses on answering that question. The first part of the course covers the nature of ethical theory and theories about the status of morality and of normative ethical claims – whether such claims can be true, how moral knowledge is possible, and what grounds or reasons we have for acting in accord with our moral judgments. We also consider and evaluate ethical relativism, moral nihilism, and moral objectivism. The second part of the course covers normative theories of ethics, including Natural Law Theory, Utilitarianism, Kantianism, Ethical Pluralism, and Virtue Ethics, as well as the problem of Egoism and how to understand how Religion and Morality are related. In the third part of the course we turn our attention towards making considered moral judgments about controversial moral subjects of concern to us in this day and age, including euthanasia, abortion, poverty and affluence, animal rights and biomedical research, and torture, terrorism, and war.

Classics of Political and Constitutional Theory 
20407 01 (28747)

Flint
9:30-10:45 MW

This course will examine a number of the fundamental texts in political and constitutional theory, with an emphasis on works of special importance to the British and American political systems. The principal authors to be read are Aristotle, Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, the authors of The Federalist Papers, Bagehot, Marx and Mill. The class will be conducted as a combination of lecture and discussion.

Requirements: In addition to contributing in class, students will be required to write two short papers.  There will also be a few quizzes and a comprehensive final exam.
 

Classics of Political and Constitutional Theory  
20407 02 (28746)

Flint
11:45-1:00 MW

This course will examine a number of the fundamental texts in political and constitutional theory, with an emphasis on works of special importance to the British and American political systems. The principal authors to be read are Aristotle, Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, the authors of The Federalist Papers, Bagehot, Marx and Mill. The class will be conducted as a combination of lecture and discussion.

Requirements: In addition to contributing in class, students will be required to write two short papers.  There will also be a few quizzes and a comprehensive final exam.

Morality and Modernity 
20415 01 (22222)

Solomon 
10:40-11:30 MW(F)
Co-req: 22415 
Cross List: HESB 30232 01

Our society is deeply divided by controversies over a range of moral issues. Underlying the controversies surrounding issues such as abortion, euthanasia, the conduct of war, and the distribution of scarce medical resources are profound disagreements about the nature and purpose of morality.

In this course, we will read Alasdair MacIntyre’s groundbreaking account of the emergence of modern morality, After Virtue, and compare his interpretation of the morality of modernity with that offered by Charles Taylor in The Ethics of Authenticity. We will also read works by two of the philosophers who have done the most to shape modern moral thought; Immanuel Kant and Friedrich Nietzsche.

Having traced the origins of our deepest moral disputes in the history of modern morality we will turn to questions of how, if at all, these disputes could be resolved and which ways of thinking about ethics are best able to meet the challenges of the modern world.

Books: Alasdair MacIntyre, After Virtue (ISBN-10: 0268035040). Charles Taylor, The Ethics of Authenticity(ISBN-10: 0674268636). Friedrich Nietzsche, On The Genealogy of Morals (ISBN-10: 019283617X). Immanuel Kant, Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals (ISBN-10: 087220166X), Walter Miller Jr. A Canticle for Leibowitz (ISBN-10: 0060892994).

Requirements: 3 short (3-5 page) papers and 1 medium length (5-7 page) paper, a midterm, and a final examination.

Self and Society
20423 01 (28748)

Hicks, D.
12:30-1:45 TR

This course is an introductory survey to social and political philosophy. The approach is historical, examining the intertwining strands of the development of individualism, egalitarianism, and capitalism in Western political life and philosophy from the late Middle Ages until today.  The assignment/grading scheme will be determined by the students at the beginning of the term, within guidelines set by the instructor.  Total writing requirements will be about 20 pages.  This course will be a seminar, requiring significant, regular student participation.  For a preliminary reading list, please contact the instructor. 

Contemporary Political Philosophy 
20425 01 (24105)

Weithman 
2:00-3:15 TR
Pre-requisite: ALHN 13950

This course is intended for first year students in the Honors Program, and is intended to satisfy their second philosophy requirement.

The last four decades have been an extraordinarily exciting time in the development of political philosophy.  Many of the central questions in the subject have received their most authoritative formulation and treatment since the 19th century.  This course will survey developments in English-speaking philosophical world in that period.    A good deal of attention will be devoted to the ground-breaking writings of John Rawls, and to critiques of his work.  Topics to be covered include the foundations of constitutional and human rights, the foundations of economic justice in domestic and global settings, and the point and demands of equality.  We will consider some other problems briefly, including the conditions of just war in the contemporary world and moral problems connected with torture.  Most of the readings will be drawn from books by John Rawls, Gerald Cohen and Amartya Sen, though we will also look at articles by other authors.  The course will be run as a seminar.

This course presupposes that students have taken “Introduction to Philosophy”.  Other than that, it has no prerequisites except a willingness to work hard and take part in class discussions.  Students may be asked to do a small amount of reading over winter break as background for the course.

Requirements include frequent writing assignments, a class presentation and a comprehensive final examination. 

Are We Eating Good Food? 
20429 01 (26215)

Hicks, D.
9:30-10:45 TR 
Cross List:  STV 20429 01

In the last few years, an increasing number of voices have answered the title question for this course with a resounding "no." In this course, we will develop conceptual tools from ethics, political philosophy, and philosophy of science to critically engage with both proponents and critics of several aspects of our contemporary food system. Possible topics will be picked based on student interest, and include but are not limited to vegetarianism, conventional vs. organic agriculture, genetic engineering, justice for food workers, scientific and public policy controversies over nutrition and health, food deserts, and agricultural economics. We will also be working on a service project with a local food-related organization in order to understand how these issues appear in and influence the food system of the Michiana region.  Graded assignments include four short papers, two longer papers, a final research paper, and significant class participation. 

History of Aesthetics & Philosophy of Art II
20431 01 (28749)

Rush
3:30-4:45 TR
Cross List: PHIL 43326 01

Course description: a conceptual-historical survey of aesthetic theory and the philosophy of art that picks up with 17th Century European thought and concludes in the present day.  The main readings will be historical sources in both philosophy and art theory more broadly construed, with ample attention to various types and genres of art and in-depth consideration of several individual works.  Topics discussed: the relation of art to truth, the nature of artistic representation, natural and artistic beauty, the relation of ethics / politics to art, the concept of genius, social roles of art, and art in the technological age. 

Requirements: This course is designed to both fulfill the second philosophy course requirement for general education and as a stand-alone majors’ course.  Writing requirements will differ, depending on which version of the course one opts for.  Taken at the 20000-level a midterm and final examination is required; taken at the 40000-level in addition a paper of 10-12 pp. is required.

Please note: this is the second of a two-semester series of lectures. The first part covers aesthetics and philosophy of art from antiquity through the Renaissance.  Neither part is a prerequisite for the other; they may be taken individually, serially, or both out of order.

Food Ethics
20432 01 (28750)

Hicks, A.
9:30-10:45 TR

Recently the topic of food has made its way into popular ethical discourse, raising questions such as, “Should we genetically modify our food?” “Should I buy only organic food?” “Should I buy only local food?” “Should I go on a diet?” “Should I become a vegetarian?” and “How should we feed everyone as the population increases?” These questions loom large for all of us, since food is an important part of everyday life and holds a great deal of social and cultural significance. In this course, we’ll look at some of the ethical problems raised by food production and consumption.

We'll begin by looking at a moral problem raised by contemporary food production: is it permissible to use—and kill—animals for food and, if so, under what circumstances? We will discuss different understandings of the moral status of animals, as well as how to weigh animal interests against the interests of farmers and consumers..

We'll continue by looking at a problem raised by contemporary food consumption: what is the relationship between current conceptions of gender and eating habits? In particular: in what way does one's gender affect how one eats, and do debates about food (concerning locavorism, vegetarianism, and the “obesity epidemic”) affect people of different genders differently? If so, is that acceptable?

Student presentations will make up another significant component of the course: each student will pick a philosophical food-related topic, develop a term paper (due at the end of the semester) on that topic, and give a presentation on that topic to the class. In addition to the term paper and class presentation, students will be expected to take turns leading class discussions on assigned readings, and to participate regularly in class discussions.

Food Ethics
20432 02 (28751)

Hicks, A.
11:00-12:15 TR

Recently the topic of food has made its way into popular ethical discourse, raising questions such as, “Should we genetically modify our food?” “Should I buy only organic food?” “Should I buy only local food?” “Should I go on a diet?” “Should I become a vegetarian?” and “How should we feed everyone as the population increases?” These questions loom large for all of us, since food is an important part of everyday life and holds a great deal of social and cultural significance. In this course, we’ll look at some of the ethical problems raised by food production and consumption.

We'll begin by looking at a moral problem raised by contemporary food production: is it permissible to use—and kill—animals for food and, if so, under what circumstances? We will discuss different understandings of the moral status of animals, as well as how to weigh animal interests against the interests of farmers and consumers..

We'll continue by looking at a problem raised by contemporary food consumption: what is the relationship between current conceptions of gender and eating habits? In particular: in what way does one's gender affect how one eats, and do debates about food (concerning locavorism, vegetarianism, and the “obesity epidemic”) affect people of different genders differently? If so, is that acceptable?

Student presentations will make up another significant component of the course: each student will pick a philosophical food-related topic, develop a term paper (due at the end of the semester) on that topic, and give a presentation on that topic to the class. In addition to the term paper and class presentation, students will be expected to take turns leading class discussions on assigned readings, and to participate regularly in class discussions.

 


Philosophy in Literature
PHIL 20433 01 (CRN 29928)

Curtis Franks
5:00 - 6:15  TR

An introduction to the ways in which philosophical ideas can be handled in literature, both in literary critiques of philosophy (e.g. satire), and in the use of fiction to put forward philosophical ideas (e.g. poioumenon).

Our principal readings will be:

Clouds by Aristophones
Candide by Voltaire
Sartor Resartus by Carlyle
Alice in Wonderland by Carroll
selected stories by Borges
Wittgenstein's Mistress by Markson

all of which will be accompanied with essays about their philosophical themes.

Students will be required to write three essays, which will be read by and critiqued by all members of the class (and subsequently rewritten).

Science, Technology, and Society
20606 01 (24655)

Ruiz de Olano Altuna
12:50-1:40 MW
Cross List: STV 20556 01, HESB 302246 01

Science, Technology, and Society
20606 02 (29822)

Jurkowitz
12:30-1:45 TR
Cross List: STV 20556 02, STV 20556 03

 

Philosophy of Science
20617 01 (28752)

Chakravartty
11:00-12:15 TR

This course introduces and explores central issues in the philosophy of science. Topics include scientific method, inference, and explanation. We will consider some of the most influential authors in the field this past century, including the logical positivists, Popper, Kuhn, and more recent contributors to current debates. These later controversies include disagreements between scientific realists and antirealists, concerning (among other things) the idea of scientific progress and the nature and extent of scientific knowledge.

The Ethics of Emerging Weapons Technologies
20628 01 (26535)

Pence
11:00-12:15 TR
Cross List: STV 20228 01, IIPS 20912 01

 Recent advances in military technologies have led to declarations of a “revolution in military affairs.” The non-lethal “phasers set to stun” of Star Trek now have real-world analogs in electromagnetic weapons. Robotic weapons systems are increasingly reminiscent of the Star Wars battle droids, and there are remotely-controlled, armed vehicles not unlike the Batmobile. The cyberattacks of Live Free or Die Hard and the enhanced soldiers of Captain America (or toned-down versions thereof) may also be on the horizon. But as strategists contemplate new tactics that make use of emerging technologies, ethical questions are being raised by military leaders, scholars, legislators, journalists, and non-profit and humanitarian groups.

In this course, students will gain familiarity with the main forms of emerging weapons technologies and reflect on the ethical and legal considerations that bear on whether and how these weapons should be used. Topics to be covered fall into four categories: (1) types of emerging weapons technologies (drones, robotic systems, non-lethal weapons, cyberwarfare, and bioenhancement), (2) positions on the ethics of peace and war (pacifism, political realism, and just war theory), (3) the Law of Armed Conflict (customs, domestic laws, and treaties such as the Hague and Geneva Conventions), and (4) normative ethical theories (consequentialism, deontology, virtue ethics, and feminist ethics). Course grades will be determined by two papers, two exams (midterm and final), several short assignments, and class participation.

The Ethics of Emerging Weapons Technologies
20628 02 (26534)

Pence
2:00-3:15 TR
Cross List: STV 20228 02, IIPS 20912 02

Recent advances in military technologies have led to declarations of a “revolution in military affairs.” The non-lethal “phasers set to stun” of Star Trek now have real-world analogs in electromagnetic weapons. Robotic weapons systems are increasingly reminiscent of the Star Wars battle droids, and there are remotely-controlled, armed vehicles not unlike the Batmobile. The cyberattacks of Live Free or Die Hard and the enhanced soldiers of Captain America (or toned-down versions thereof) may also be on the horizon. But as strategists contemplate new tactics that make use of emerging technologies, ethical questions are being raised by military leaders, scholars, legislators, journalists, and non-profit and humanitarian groups.

In this course, students will gain familiarity with the main forms of emerging weapons technologies and reflect on the ethical and legal considerations that bear on whether and how these weapons should be used. Topics to be covered fall into four categories: (1) types of emerging weapons technologies (drones, robotic systems, non-lethal weapons, cyberwarfare, and bioenhancement), (2) positions on the ethics of peace and war (pacifism, political realism, and just war theory), (3) the Law of Armed Conflict (customs, domestic laws, and treaties such as the Hague and Geneva Conventions), and (4) normative ethical theories (consequentialism, deontology, virtue ethics, and feminist ethics). Course grades will be determined by two papers, two exams (midterm and final), several short assignments, and class participation.

Philosophy of Medicine & Health Care Reform
20631 01 (28753)

Pilkington
8:00-9:15 MW
Cross List: HESB 30275 01

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the moral and political issues involved in health care reform.  After a brief introduction to the philosophy of medicine and bioethics, we will focus on the historical events and sociological factors that led to the current need for health care reform. In the second part of the course, we will pause to examine a popular account of the principles that underlie the ethical practice of medicine. In the third part of the course, we will consider some issues having to do with the allocation of scarce medical resources. We will close the course by taking a look a recent philosophical work on health care and by reflecting on original student presentations responding to the question: Can we reform the healthcare system in America and, if so, how?

Philosophy of Medicine & Health Care Reform
20631 02 (28753)

Pilkington
9:30-10:45 MW
Cross List: HESB 30275 02

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the moral and political issues involved in health care reform.  After a brief introduction to the philosophy of medicine and bioethics, we will focus on the historical events and sociological factors that led to the current need for health care reform. In the second part of the course, we will pause to examine a popular account of the principles that underlie the ethical practice of medicine. In the third part of the course, we will consider some issues having to do with the allocation of scarce medical resources. We will close the course by taking a look a recent philosophical work on health care and by reflecting on original student presentations responding to the question: Can we reform the healthcare system in America and, if so, how?

Philosophy of Religion
20801 01 (26221)

Baldwin
3:30-4:45 TR
Cross List: HESB 30233 01

One broad way to think about the philosophy of religion is characterize it as 'critical thinking about religion.'  In this course we will survey some of the philosophical issues about religious thought that confront every person who thinks seriously about religion.  These questions include: What are the varieties of religious experience and how can having them ground beliefs about the nature of ultimate reality or God? What are the differing conceptions of the nature of ultimate reality or God and by what criteria are we to assess their merits? What kinds of cases have been offered to justify beliefs both for and against the existence of The God of Traditional Theism?  Do arguments based on evil and suffering raise any significant problems for the rationality and probable truth of religious beliefs?  What is the relationship between religion and science and morality?  Are there any ways to resolve the conflicting truth claims of different religions?  Is Plantinga’s ‘evolutionary argument against naturalism’ sound?  What can we learn about philosophy and religion from the views of C. S. Lewis and Sigmund Freud?  Is C.S. Lewis’ ‘argument from reason’ (or something like it) sound?

Philosophy of Religion
20801 02 (26220)

Dumont
5:00-6:15 TR
Cross List: HESB 30233 02

A philosophical examination of religious beliefs. Topics include the existence and nature of God, the problem of evil, immortality, miracles, the meaning of religious language, the basis for religious belief, and the varieties and conflicts of religions. Readings will be taken from both classical and contemporary sources.

Requirements: Term paper, midterm exam, and final exam.

Philosophical Reflections on Christian Belief: C.S. Lewis and After 
20802 01 (24530)

Potter 
3:30-4:45 TR
Cross List: HESB 30238 01

There are two main aims of the course. First, we’ll do a philosophical survey of some of the important elements of the Christian faith - the topics treated will include arguments for God’s existence, the problem of evil, the atonement, hell, as well as more practical elements like prayer, Scripture, and forgiveness. Second, we’ll gain a more systematic understanding of C.S. Lewis’ life and thought. While we won’t confine ourselves to material Lewis has written (we’ll draw from contemporary philosophical literature on each of these topics), we’ll approach all of these topics through his work.

Requirements: Two exams and a term paper.

Philosophical Theology
20810 01 (E0085)

Speaks
12:30-1:20 TR
Co-req: 22810

Some work in the philosophy of religion is concerned with arguments for or against particular religious theses; other work in the philosophy of religion is concerned with understanding what such theses mean, and trying to see whether they are coherent. In this course we'll do some of the first, but more of the second. The topics we'll discuss include: the attributes of God; the trinity; the incarnation; the atonement; original sin; and the possibility of life after death. We may also discuss peculiarly Catholic doctrines like papal infallibility and the Catholic view of the sacraments. The course will meet three times per week, with two lectures and one discussion section. Students will write two papers (of roughly 5-7 pages in length) and complete a midterm and final exam. Readings will be made available on the course web site, which is at
http://www.nd.edu/~jspeaks/courses/2012-13/20810/index.html

Ancient & Medieval Philosophy 
30301 01 (21941)
Freddoso
1:30-2:45 MW
Cross List: MI 30301 01

An introductory survey of western philosophy from the 6th-century B.C. Presocratics to the 16th-century Scholastics. The lectures will focus primarily on Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, and St. Thomas Aquinas, using the twin themes of nature and human nature as an occasion for (a) formulating with some precision the main metaphysical and ethical problematics that emerge from the works of Plato and Aristotle, (b) investigating the influence of Plato and Aristotle on the Catholic intellectual tradition, and (c) exploring in some depth the relation between faith and reason as articulated by the medievals.

Because the lectures will not try to cover all the important figures (though there will be ample references to them, as well as to key early modern philosophers), the students will be required to read all of the assigned secondary source, viz., James Jordan's Western Philosophy: From Antiquity to the Middle Ages, as well as the primary sources assigned for the lectures. In addition, the requirements include (a) two 6-7 page papers on assigned topics, and (b) two exams.

This course is meant primarily to introduce philosophy majors to important figures and issues in the history of philosophy, and so the course will be taught at a higher level of sophistication than ordinary second courses in philosophy. As long as they understand this, however, non-philosophy majors, as well as the undecided, are welcome.

Ancient & Medieval Philosophy 
30301 02 (26222)

Dumont
3:30-4:45 TR
Cross List: MI 30301 02

A survey of Western philosophy from its beginnings in the early Greek physicists to the late middle ages. The emphasis in class will be on the reading and analysis of fundamental texts by main figures of the period: Parmenides, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Anselm, Bonaventure, and Thomas Aquinas. Concurrent reading of a standard history will supply additional background and continuity.

Requirements: Two papers (one each for the ancient and medieval portions of the course), a mid-term, and final examination.

History of Modern Philosophy 
30302 01 (20966)

Joy
11:00-12:15 TR

Modern philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries not only transformed the traditions they inherited from Ancient and Medieval philosophers, but they also criticized each other's new systems of thought.  This course asks: What exactly was the theory of ideas?  How did its rise and fall define the changing problems that were central to the philosophy of Descartes, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant?  We will focus on key problems addressed by their epistemology, metaphysics, and natural philosophy, and also consider how these problems influenced their ethics.

Requirements:  Written work includes two papers, a mid-term, and a final exam.  Class participation and regular attendance are important.

History of Modern Philosophy 
30302 02 (28765)

Joy
2:00-3:15 TR

Modern philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries not only transformed the traditions they inherited from Ancient and Medieval philosophers, but they also criticized each other's new systems of thought.  This course asks: What exactly was the theory of ideas?  How did its rise and fall define the changing problems that were central to the philosophy of Descartes, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant?  We will focus on key problems addressed by their epistemology, metaphysics, and natural philosophy, and also consider how these problems influenced their ethics.

Requirements:  Written work includes two papers, a mid-term, and a final exam.  Class participation and regular attendance are important. 

Formal Logic 
30313 01 (20317)

Bays
9:30-10:45 TR

This course will provide an introduction to first-order formal logic.  We'll begin by introducing a  nice symbolic language and then learn how to "translate" between this language and ordinary English.   Next, we'll study the notions of deduction and entailment as they are defined for this language.  Finally, and on a more explicitly philosophical note, we'll discuss the degree to which these formally defined notions manage to capture ordinary language notions like "logical consequence" or "argumentative validity."

Philosophical Issues in Physics 
30389 01 (24119)

Howard 
11:45-1:00 MW
Cross List: PHYS 30389, STV 30189

This course is an historically organized survey of major issues in the philosophical foundations of quantum mechanics. Working with a mix of

primary and secondary texts, we will first survey the development of the quantum theory through the emergence of wave and matrix mechanics in the 1920s, the aim being to understand the context in which Bohr's complementarity interpretation and debates about it first arose. A careful study of the Bohr-Einstein debate over the completeness of quantum mechanics will be followed by a review of the major controversies over interpretation in the second half of the twentieth century, including the measurement problem, hidden variables theories, and Bell's theorem. The course will conclude with a look at new questions of interpretation unique to the context of quantum field theory. The course will not assume advanced training in physics.

Plato and Homer
43110 01 (28766)

O’ Connor
12:30-1:45 TR

We will read Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, and perhaps Hesiod’s Theogony and Works and Days, with a view to understanding Plato’s love for them and critique of them. We will read a number of Plato’s dialogues, including the Republic

Kant’s Ethics & Philosophy of Religion
43186 01 (28767)

Ameriks
11:00-12:15 TR

Ever since its initial presentation in the Enlightenment, Kant's ethics has been considered one of the three or four most important approaches in all practical philosophy. This course will presuppose no prior knowledge of Kant and will cover a wide range of readings from the Practical Philosophy volume of the Cambridge Kant in English edition, supplemented by short readings concerning topics such as the philosophy of religion.

In addition to written preparations for discussion each week, there will be a short and a longer paper assignment.

Proust and the Philosophers 
43210 01 (28768)

Watson
5:00-6:15 TR

Marcel Proust’s A Recherché Du Temps Perdue (In Search of Lost Time) has been called the most important novel of the twentieth century. Just previous to its inception, its author was uncertain of its status. “Must I make of it a novel, a philosophical study, am I a novelist?” (Notebook of 1908, p. 60-1). Even well into the project, in a volume not published until after Proust’s death, the narrator of the Recherche declared “a certain philosopher” to be at the core of his essential personality” (The Captive, p. 5).  Philosophy thus was very close to this project. Recent research has revealed the extent to which Proust himself was substantially trained in philosophy (eg., the metaphysics of Schopenhauer or the aesthetics of Hegel and Schelling). Perhaps even more significant is the extent of the influence of The Search on philosophers after it. Among others, Proust’s work played an essential role in the thought of Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Ricoeur, Beckett, Benjamin, Bataille, Adorno, Rorty, Ricoeur, Kristeva and Taylor. This seminar will begin by reading extensive parts of this multivolume work in translation and considering the philosophical positions it transforms. We will then examine Proust’s influence in a number of areas of philosophy, including epistemology, the philosophy of mind, aesthetics, the philosophy of history and social science. This in turn will allow us to confront the relationship between philosophy and literature more particularly.

Requirements: Research Paper, Seminar Presentation.

History of Aesthetics & Philosophy of Art
43326 01 (28769) 

Rush
3:30-4:45 TR
Cross List: PHIL 20431 01

Course description: a conceptual-historical survey of aesthetic theory and the philosophy of art that picks up with 17th Century European thoughts and concludes in the present day.  The main readings will be historical sources in both philosophy and art theory more broadly construed, with ample attention to various types and genres of art and in-depth consideration of several individual works.  Topics discussed: the relation of art to truth the nature of artistic representation, natural and artistic beauty, the relation of ethics / politics to art, the concept of genius, social roles of art, and art in the technological age. 

Requirements: This course is designed to both fulfill the second philosophy course requirement for general education and as a stand-alone majors’ course.  Writing requirements will differ, depending on which version of the course one opts for.  Taken at the 20000-level a midterm and final examination is required; taken at the 40000-level in addition a paper of 10-12 pp. is required.

Please note: this is the second of a two-semester series of lectures. The first part covers aesthetics and philosophy of art from antiquity through the Renaissance.  Neither part is a prerequisite for the other; they may be taken individually, serially, or both out of order.

Ethics of Aristotle & Aquinas 
43327 01 (28770)

Solomon
4:30-5:45 MW

Many philosophers regard the ethical thought of Aristotle  as expressed in the Nicomachean Ethics as the high point of ethical thought in the ancient world.  Similarly, the ethical thought of Thomas Aquinas, especially as expressed in the Summa Theologiae and in the Commentary on Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, is frequently regarded as the summit of ethical thinking in the medieval period.    In spite of many surface differences between the pagan thought of Aristotle and the deeply Christian thought of Aquinas, the thought of Aristotle had an enormous influence on Aquinas, an influence discernible not only in the particular views held by each of these thinkers, but also in the overall structures of their ethical theories.  In this course, we will do a close reading of the Nicomachean Ethics with the goal of achieving a critical understanding of Aristotle’ ethical theory.   Following this reading, we will examine key texts from the Summa and the Commentary on the Ethicsin order to achieve a similar understanding of Aquinas’s ethics.  In the final part of the course, we will look briefly at a number of contemporary figures (including Alasdair MacIntyre, Ralph McInerny, Etienne Gilson, and John Finnis) who have held diverging views on the relation of Aristotle and Aquinas.  Our goal will be both to understand the ethical views of these great thinkers and to come to a better appreciation of the relation of their views.  In particular, we will be concerned to discern how the addition of Christian insights to pagan philosophy both allows for continuity and divergence.

The Cardinal & Theological Virtues
43328 01 (28771)

O’Callaghan
9:30-10:45 MW

An examination of the nature of virtue generally, and its manifestation in the cardinal virtues of Justice, Temperance, Courage, and Prudence and the Theological virtues of Faith, Hope, and Love.  What is meant by saying 'cardinal virtue' versus 'theological'.  How are the virtues related and how do they differ.  Basis of the course will be the treatment of these virtues given by Josef Piper supplemented by selections from Aquinas.

Politics and Conscience 
43431 01 (25391)

Keys
11:45-1:00 MW
Cross List: POLS 30653 01, HESB 30207 01, THEO 30653 01, IIPS 30700

Against a backdrop of large-scale society, mass movements, and technological bureaucracy, the invocation of "conscience" recalls the individual human person as a meaningful actor in the political sphere. But what is conscience, and what are its rights and responsibilities? What is it about conscience that ought to command governmental respect? Are there limits to its autonomy? What role should conscience play in questions of war and peace, law-abidingness and civil disobedience, citizenship and political leadership? And how does the notion of conscience relate to concepts of natural law and natural rights, rationality and prudence, religion and toleration? This course engages such questions through readings from the Catholic intellectual tradition (Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Thomas More, Fransisco de Vitoria, Desiderius Erasmus, John Henry Newman, Karol Wojtyla/John Paul II, and Joseph Ratzinger/Benedict XVI) and other writers of the history of ethical-political thought (Cicero, Seneca, John Locke, Mahatma Ghandi, Jan Patocka, and Alexandr Solzhenitsyn). We consider also various contemporary reflections on conscience expressed in films, essays, letters, plays, short stories, speeches, and declarations, beginning with Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” and Václav Havel’s speech “Politics and Conscience.” This class serves as both the capstone course for the interdisciplinary minor Philosophy in the Catholic Tradition and an upper-level elective for Political Science majors and Peace Studies minors. Its format combines lecture and seminar-style discussion.

Philosophy Against Itself
43604 01 (28772)

Franks 
3:30-4:45 TR

In this lecture and discussion class we will study philosophy as a discipline paying close attention to the origins of its several contemporary streams and its place within explanatory and introspective thought more broadly. We will begin by reading some influential and radical treatises of the late 20th and early 21st Centuries whose authors claim (1) to expose mistaken preconceptions underlying the sting of familiar philosophical problems and (2) to overturn the idea of there being any especially lofty or foundational subjects open only to philosophical investigation. In different ways, these critiques suggest that philosophical problems are illusions and philosophical progress is impossible and propose freeing moves whereby the itch to philosophize simply won't arise. Later in the course we will look to historical selections from the traditional philosophical canon for anticipations of these anti-philosophical themes and for different conceptions of what philosophy is and could be.

Probable main readings will be:

Ludwig Wittgenstein, selections from the Philosophical Investigations
Robert Fogelin, Wittgensteins Critique of Philosphy
P. M. S. Hacker, Philosophy
Richard Rorty, Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature
Charles Taylor, Overcoming Epistemology
Penelope Maddy, Second Philosophy

Students will be responsible for recommending historical readings for the last unit of the class in addition to selections from Cicero and David Hume with which we will begin.

Scientific Images of Humanity 
43718 01 (28774)

Ramsey
9:30-10:45  MW

Dominant images of humanity in Western societies depict our species as free, moral, divinely created rational beings, lacking a fixed human nature. These images have long been placed under the microscope of analytic philosophy and debated in the philosophical tradition. Increasingly, scientific research—from genetics to primate behavior—demands that we reconsider both popular and philosophical notions of what it means to be human. In this class, we will examine philosophical debates about the nature of humanity vis-à-vis contemporary scientific research.

Questions we will treat include the following: What is human nature? Can we learn about human nature through the study of non-human animals? Are we naturally altruistic or selfish, violent or pacific? What does it mean to claim that a behavior is innate? Do humans have innate behaviors? Do Darwinian explanations apply to human behavior and culture or is there something that exempts humans from Darwinian adaptationist explanations? If humans are uniquely outside of Darwinian explanation, what accounts for this?

The readings will be drawn from contemporary debates in philosophy, biology, and anthropology. 

Philosophy and Medicine 
43719 01 (29266) 

Warfield
11:45-1:00 MW

We will examine philosophical issues arising within medical practice and medical issues with philosophical dimensions. The course begins with an exploration of some diagnostic and conceptual issues arising within psychiatry. We’ll then move on to examine some attempts to challenge conventional wisdom about the medical understanding of death, options for end of life situations and organ transplantation guidelines. The end of the semester will be spent on case studies of medical decision making and doctor-patient interactions concerning these decisions.

Requirements: several papers in various formats.

Historical & Conceptual Foundations of Spacetime Theory
43720 01 (29267)

Brading
9:00-11:30 W
Cross List:  PHIL 93871 01, HPS 93871

This seminar is an historically organized examination of major issues in the philosophical foundations of space-time theory. The roots of many contemporary debates are found in the spatial and temporal framework introduced by Newton to solve problems in Descartes’s theory of motion. We begin with the problems that Descartes was trying to solve, with Newton’s response to Descartes, and with Newton’s own positive proposals. We consider the arguments for and against Newton’s proposals as they developed in the period from Newton through Kant and beyond to 1905, the year of Einstein’s special theory of relativity. The focus of the second half of the semester will be Einstein’s special and general theories of relativity. We consider the advent of these in their historical context, the contemporary reaction to both theories, and the present day situation. Key conceptual issues, such as conventionality of simultaneity, the ‘hole argument’, and the significance of general covariance, will be considered from both a historical and a modern-day perspective. Readings will include both primary and secondary sources. The course will not assume advanced training in physics. Examination combines presentations and class participation, in-class tests, and a term paper.

Undergraduate philosophy majors wishing to take this class are strongly encouraged to consult with Professor Brading before registering.

Joint Philosophy/Theology Seminar: Ratzinger
43801 01 (22320)

Freddoso/Heintz
3:00-4:15 MW 
Cross List: THEO 43203 01 (24564)

A close study of some of the most important works of Joseph Ratzinger, both before and after his elevation to the Papacy as Pope Benedict XVI.  The works we will be reading from are Introduction to Christianity (1969, 2004), What it Means to be a Christian (1965, 2005), The Nature and Mission of Theology (1995), Truth and Tolerance (2004), The Spirit of the Liturgy (2000) , and (hot off the press) Jesus of Nazareth, Part 3: The Infancy Narratives (2012), along with a essays on conscience and hermeneutics.  The Holy Father's encyclicals Deus est Caritas and Spe Salvi will constitute the subject matter for two of the three short (6-7 pp.) papers the students will write; the other paper will be on his Regensberg Lecture.

The Origins of Analytic Philosophy
43904 01 (28775)

Blanchette
12:30-1:45 TR

In this course, we investigate the foundations of 20th-century analytic philosophy through a careful reading of such authors as Frege, Russell, Carnap, Tarski, Quine, and Kripke.  We will focus on the connection between the broadly empiricist outlook of many members of this group (the idea, roughly, that all knowledge should somehow "rest on" information given by the senses), and the new techniques

of analysis which gave rise to bold new theses about the meanings of ordinary sentences and of scientific theories.  We will investigate the extent to which both the successes and the failures of this group of thinkers have had a lasting influence on the ways in which we now think about science, language, and philosophy.  The course will be partly lecture and partly seminar; active participation is required of all students. Papers and exams.

Directed Readings 
46498 01 (20361)

Holloway

Directed Readings 
46498 02 (20459)

Holloway

Senior Thesis
48499 01 (21471)

Speaks