1st Courses in Philosophy

Spring 2017

Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 10100 01 (21890)

Speaks
12:30-1:20 TR
First Year Students Only

Philosophy is the attempt to answer, by argument, the deepest and most basic questions about the
universe. Our focus in this class will be on five such questions:
Does God exist?

  • What am I?
  • Am I free?
  • What is real?
  • What must I do?
     

Your central aim in this class will not be to learn what other people have thought about these
questions -- though you will do that too. Your central aim in this class will be to develop your
own views about the correct answers to these questions. You will be evaluated based upon your
ability to defend those views. To do that, you will have to learn how to argue. Hence, one aim of
the course will be to teach you the basic logic required to do that.

http://www3.nd.edu/~jspeaks/courses/2016-17/10100s/index.html


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 10101 01 (21249)

Karbowski
12:30-1:45 MW
First Year Students Only
 
This course is a historically oriented introduction to Philosophy. It aims to introduce students to philosophy by a close reading of the works of some of the great philosophers, including but not limited to Parmenides, Plato/Socrates, Aristotle, Avicenna, Abelard, St. Augustine, and St. Aquinas. We will examine their stances on a variety of philosophical questions about the nature of reality, knowledge, universals/particulars, morality, personhood, and the afterlife. Students should come away from the course with a deeper appreciation of the doctrines/arguments of these philosophers, of the value of critical engagement with others' beliefs, and of the value of the study of philosophy itself. The final grade in the course will be determined by the student's performance on two papers, a midterm, and a final.


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 10101 02 (22499)

Karbowski
2:00-3:15 MW
First Year Students Only


This course is a historically oriented introduction to Philosophy. It aims to introduce students to philosophy by a close reading of the works of some of the great philosophers, including but not limited to Parmenides, Plato/Socrates, Aristotle, Avicenna, Abelard, St. Augustine, and St. Aquinas. We will examine their stances on a variety of philosophical questions about the nature of reality, knowledge, universals/particulars, morality, personhood, and the afterlife. Students should come away from the course with a deeper appreciation of the doctrines/arguments of these philosophers, of the value of critical engagement with others' beliefs, and of the value of the study of philosophy itself. The final grade in the course will be determined by the student's performance on two papers, a midterm, and a final.


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 10101 04 (20318)

D. Cory
9:25-10:15 MW
First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 10101 05 (27396)

Gamez
11:00-12:15 TR
First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 10101 06 (27397)

Wells
3:30-4:45 MW
First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 10101 07 (27398)

Gamez
12:30-1:45 TR
First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 10101 08 (30205)

Wells
12:30-1:45 MW
First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 10101 10 (30383)

D. Cory
8:20-9:10 MWF
First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 10101 11 (30384)

Snapper
9:30-10:45 TR
First Year Students Only

This course introduces students to some philosophical questions and helps them become more skilled at formulating and understanding arguments. Each class will be a mixture of lecture and discussion. We will discuss arguments, morality, God, religion and science, race, climate change, robot ethics, abortion, personhood, knowledge, and freedom.


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 10101 12 (30385)

Snapper
11:00-12:15 TR
First Year Students Only  

This course introduces students to some philosophical questions and helps them become more skilled at formulating and understanding arguments. Each class will be a mixture of lecture and discussion. We will discuss arguments, morality, God, religion and science, race, climate change, robot ethics, abortion, personhood, knowledge, and freedom.


Introduction to Philosophy: Ethics & Politics
PHIL 10105 01 (26487)

von Eschenbach
2:00-3:15 TR


Introduction to Philosophy: Ethics & Politics
PHIL 10105 02 (30479)

Jech
12:30-1:45 TR

This course will introduce students to ethics and philosophy more generally through a critical investigation of some important approaches to philosophical ethics. This investigation will center on the idea of the good life and the question of whether there is a rational principle, what the Greeks called a logos, that we can discover by means of reason, conformity to which would allow us to fulfill our natures and be, in the highest sense, ourselves. 

We will first read two authors who claim that there is—Plato and Augustine. According to Plato, we must leave our conventional understanding of what constitutes a good life and ascend “back” to this logos by means of reason and rational discussion in order to be fully ourselves and to live well; according to Augustine, on the other hand, we can rationally apprehend this logos, but we can only properly grasp and adhere to it through an act of divine grace, if the logos comes down to us—and in fact, the Logos did do so. We can classify both of these as “classical” views. We will then read two “modern” views, articulated by authors who claim that there is no rational principle of this kind, no logos we can find by means of reason and live in accordance with. In Moby Dick, Herman Melville illustrates and articulates the “death of God,” the view that there is no such principle of order at all, no absolute that names a place for us, and yet we must still find a way to live in light of this terrible lack. Kierkegaard, although agreeing that reason cannot find such a rational principle, argues that we can only live well and become the selves we are meant to be by living on the basis of faith in the power that is calling us into being, relating ourselves to the absolute by means of passion, not reason. 


God and the Good Life
PHIL 10111 01 (29739)

Sullivan
11:30-12:20 MW
First Year Students Only

Should you practice a religion?
What do you owe other people?
What would it take for your life to be meaningful?
And how should you decide what to believe when it comes to big questions like these?

In God and the Good Life, we’re searching for answers. We’ll read the best philosophical arguments addressing these questions. We’ll share our reactions to the proposals in blogs and social media editorials. We’ll come together as a large group to debate real world case studies that bear on these questions, hearing periodically from guest speakers making headlines in current debates about religion, morality and meaning. And we’ll meet in small Sustained Dialogue groups to discuss our religious and moral identities and develop virtuous friendships (to borrow Aristotle’s terminology). If you are excited about developing philosophical skills in an intense, creative community format---this is the course for you. This course fulfills the first philosophy requirement.  You must meet in a weekly dialogue group/discussion section on either Tues or Weds evenings at 8pm.   Learn more about GGL at our course website: godandgoodlife.org. Or watch our course trailer: https://youtu.be/EMKbtSC3-2I 


Philosophy University Seminar
PHIL 13185 01 (21263) 

Brading
9:30-10:45 TR 
First Year Students Only

What is the world made of, and how does it work? This is the question through which we will find our way into philosophy. We will ask about what there is (metaphysics, ontology, science), how we can know (epistemology, methodology, scientific method), and how we can talk about all this with scientific theories. Addressing these questions takes us into issues of our own place in the world, of what makes a human being, and, in light of all this, into questions of how we should live and act. Throughout this course we will use scientific developments to help us think about philosophical questions, and philosophical questions to help us think about science. Science topics will include questions of scientific knowledge and scientific method, and may include philosophical issues in physics and biology, and contemporary ethical questions associated with medicine, food, and technology. 


Philosophy University Seminar: What is a Philosophical Problem?
PHIL 13185 02 (21628) 

Joy
11:00-12:15 TR 
First Year Students Only 

What is a philosophical problem?  How are philosophical problems related to what we study in the natural sciences, the social sciences, and religion?  This introduction to Philosophy focuses on rival ways of engaging in philosophical inquiry, including those of Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Mill, and several 21st-century thinkers.  Readings will cover the history of philosophy as well as recent writings in ethics and the neurosciences.

Requirements:  This University Seminar satisfies the 100-level Philosophy requirement.  Class participation and regular attendance are important to success in the course.  Classes will consist of both lecture and discussion.  Written work includes four medium-length papers.


Philosophy University Seminar: Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 13185 03 (26114) 

Blanchette
2:00-3:15 TR 
First Year Students Only

This course is an introduction to philosophy, focusing on philosophical questions related to: the existence of God, the nature of human knowledge, and the relationship of the citizen to the state. Readings are drawn from historical and contemporary sources. Requirements include several short and medium-length papers, and a final exam. Active participation is required.


Philosophy University Seminar
PHIL 13185 04 (21630) 

T. Cory
11:00-12:15 TR 
First Year Students Only

This university seminar introduces philosophical problems concerning human knowing, acting, and living in society, through a rigorous study of seminal texts from the history of philosophy. We will investigate themes such as justice, moral choices, friendship, the relationship between faith and reason, and the roles of work, leisure, and religion in society. Emphasis will be placed on attentive reading and discussion of texts, and an in-depth study of the philosophical problems that they pose.  


Philosophy University Seminar
PHIL 13185 05 (21263) 

Kraus
2:00-3:15 TR 
First Year Students Only 


Philosophy University Seminar
PHIL 13185 06 (21631) 

Studenberg
3:30-4:45 TR 
First Year Students Only 

We will start this course by studying Rene Descartes’s Meditations on First Philosophy (1641)—one of the most important texts of Western philosophy. Descartes has much to say about our nature: essentially we are nonphysical thinking things. We then move on to read Barry Dainton’s book Self—a contemporary variation on Descartes’s views of about what we are. We then address the topic of the freedom of the will. Our guide—Mark Balaguer—argues that we may well have free will (the question is still open), and that this is so no matter whether we are material or nonmaterial beings. The course closes with the question what it is to live a good life, what the things are that are worth striving for and the presence of which make life good. 

Requirements: 
Five short papers, amounting to roughly 25 written pages. 
Participation in classroom discussion. 

Books:
Rene Descartes: Meditations on First Philosophy [will be made available on Sakai]
Barry Dainton: Self [you have to get this on you own—our bookstore can’t order it]
Mark Balaguer: Free Will [this is available electronically in our library]
Thomas Hurka: The Best Things in Life [should be available in the bookstore]


Philosophy University Seminar
PHIL 13185 07 (21629) 

Watson
3:30-4:45 TR 
First Year Students Only 


Philosophy University Seminar
PHIL 13185 08 (21533) 

Kelsey
12:30-1:45 TR 
First Year Students Only 

Plato’s Republic contains many ideas about many topics; most of the topics are of manifest human interest, and most of the ideas are developed with tremendous imagination and power. But though in these respects the book is an ideal text for a first course in philosophy, it is also very demanding: it is an advanced book, not addressed to beginners; it is a long book, devoted to a single, complicated line of argument; it is an old book, set in a world that is nowadays in many ways very alien.

Still, on the principle that few things worth doing are easy, and that anything worth doing is worth doing well, in this course we will read Plato’s Republic, in its entirety, twice: once relatively slowly, in order to have time to practice new skills, and then again relatively quickly, with an eye on the forest as opposed to the trees. Both times we will read with an eye ultimately on exploring, at leisure and in freedom, the ideas the book contains and the ideas it provokes in us.


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 20101 01 (26997) 

Bianchetti
9:30-10:45 TR

1)   Is there a God?
2)   What ought I to do?
3)   What do I know?
We will learn what some of the greatest philosophers and other brilliant minds have thought about these questions. Even more importantly, we will develop our own attitudes and views. Are these questions answerable by reason or by faith? What does it even mean to answer questions like these?  What obstacles, if any, exist to answering these questions? How will reflection on these questions shape our identities?
We will rigorously engage with these problems in order to become able to rationally elaborate, defend, communicate, and, if appropriate, revise our views on the matter. Hence we will be learning the basic logic required to do that. Evaluation will be based upon your ability to rationally defend your views on these matters.
Class activities will include group discussions of various sorts and writing in groups.Students will choose some specific topics on which we will concentrate.
This course fulfills the first philosophy requirement.


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 20101 02 (20937) 

Baldwin
3:30-4:45 MW


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 20101 03 (20937) 

Baldwin
2:00-3:15 MW


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 20101 04 (30216) 

Patillo
2:00-3:15 MW


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 20101 05 (30215) 

Patillo
12:30-1:45 TR


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 20101 06 (30217) 

Rossi
3:30-4:45 TR


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 20105 01 (26998) 

Reimers
9:30-10:45 TR  


Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 20201 01 (24376) 

Reimers
8:20-9:10 MWF